Utilising systematic reviews: is another trial necessary or ethical?

You don’t have to look too far to see the benefits of systematic reviews and their summary results. The well known Cochrane logo depicts a real example, highlighting the value of systematically pooling data for meta-analysis and in this case demonstrating the clear benefit of corticosteroids in accelerating lung maturation in preterm babies. Systematic reviews … More Utilising systematic reviews: is another trial necessary or ethical?

Selective reporting bias: types, impact and ways to reduce it

Selective reporting of outcomes is just one type of reporting bias and there are a number of ways in which it can arise. In the previous linked blog we gave an example of the effect of selective reporting bias through under-reporting of data. So what could have been done to avoid the “SwitchBP” scenario? Perhaps … More Selective reporting bias: types, impact and ways to reduce it

Selective reporting bias: do you really need to report every outcome?

A large part of being a scientist is venturing into the unknown. You come up with hypotheses and test them through experiments. The problem is that more often than not, the experiments don’t work. By that I mean that they don’t give you the BIG interesting outcome you were hoping for, the one that will … More Selective reporting bias: do you really need to report every outcome?

Research methods & reporting tools

I noticed this on twitter from the Research to Publication eLearning programme at the BMJ. A really helpful resource for research and teaching: (thanks BMJ)   How to estimate the health benefits of additional research and changing clinical practice Published November 25, 2015 Three simple rules to ensure reasonably credible subgroup analyses Published November 04, 2015 STARD … More Research methods & reporting tools